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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken: …protecting American’s privacy. But when almost everything about these programs is secret. And when the companies involved are under strict gag orders, the American public has no way of knowing whether we’re getting that balance right. I think that’s bad for privacy and bad for democracy. Tomorrow I'm introducing a bill to address this. It will force the government to disclose how many Americans have had their information collected under key authorities in the foreign intelligence
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken continued 1: surveillance act. It will also force the government to disclose how many Americans have had their information reviewed by federal agents. My bill would also allow private companies to disclose aggregate figures about the number of FISA orders that they are receiving and the number of their users that these orders have affected. Two weeks ago a broad coalition of 63 internet companies and bipartisan civil liberties groups sent a letter to the president
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken continued 2: asking for the reforms that my bill would make law. I'm proud to say that i am introducing my bill with the support of chairman Leahy, Senator Blumenthal and a number of other Senators who are not on the judiciary committee. From what I just heard from Senator Feinstein there may be some overlaps in our approaches and I’d be happy to work with her.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken: Transparency is part of that balance. I do not want a situation where the government is transparent only when it is convenient for the government. Litt: i think -- Franken: about an hour ago, ODNI declassified a FISA court order under section 215. That’s a good thing. But ODNI has know for weeks that this hearing was coming. And yet, ODNI
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken continued 1A: released this material just a few minutes before the hearing began. Again it's a step forward, but you get the feeling when it’s ad hoc transparency. That doesn’t engender trust. Litt: i couldn’t agree with you more. I think we have an obligation to go through and look at the bad as well as the good and declassify what can be declassified without danger. We did actually have a discussion yesterday within the executive branch about whether or not we should
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Franken continued 2A: release these documents this morning or not because it’s generally not a good idea to release things on the morning of the hearing. Litt: We came to the conclusion that once we made the determination that the documents should be declassified, there was no justification for holding them up any longer. Franken: Did you just start thinking about that decision, like, yesterday? You’ve know this for a long time. You might have thought about this weeks ago and said maybe not the day of. Litt: We have been thinking about this for some time
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Litt: continued: We’ve been processing these as quickly as we can. You’ll note that the documents that were released contain some redactions of information that remains classified. It’s a rather time-consuming inter-agency process to reach a consensus on what can safely be released. Franken: my time is up. I think that we should create a strong permanent set of public reporting requirements that will empower the public to reach their own conclusions
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
problem in this debate., and that's the fact that despite the large amount of Americans information being collected under the foreign intelligence law those laws lack any substantial public reporting requirements. The government doesn’t have to give even a rough estimate of how many American’s information is being collected. it doesn't have to tell Americans how much of their information is actually seen by national security officials.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
they have no way of knowing if we're getting that balance right. My bill would change this. It would make the government give annual statistics on the number of America's information collected. and the number whose information is actually reviewed. It would also let companies disclose agreements and disclose aggregate statistics on the number of requests they get and the number of accounts affected.
Al Franken
U.S. Senator, D-Minesotta
CSPAN2 10/02/2013
I'm very pleased to report that yesterday morning America's leading tech companies from Apple to Google, to Microsoft, to Facebook and Twitter to Yahoo!, all of these companies sent a letter supporting my bill urging this committee and Congress to pass it.
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